Now is the Time to Tell the DEC and Gov. Cuomo Not to Frack with NY’s Water!

Now is the Time to Tell the DEC and Gov. Cuomo
Not to Frack with NY’s Water!

don't Frack with NY Water graphic

The fracking threat is imminent. Albany could permit companies to drill for natural gas using high-volume hydraulic fracturing (fracking) in New York State starting as early as 2012—and without adequate protections for drinking water. Riverkeeper is filing detailed comments on the Department of Environmental Conservation’s proposed regulations, and the DEC and Gov. Cuomo need to hear from you, too. Personal expressions of your concerns are key to stopping the rush to frack, and the next two months offer the last meaningful opportunities for you to tell Albany what you think.  November will also be your last and only chance to attend a DEC hearing on this issue and have your voices heard. 

Your Fracking Checklist

Submit comments online or via mail on NY’s fracking proposal by Dec. 12;

Attend a public hearing on NY’s fracking proposal in November (join Riverkeeper at NYC hearing November 30); and,

Support Riverkeeper’s efforts to protect New York’s drinking water.

Get Started!

JoinRiverkeeper is a member-supported watchdog organization dedicated to defending the Hudson River and its tributaries and protecting the drinking water supply of nine million New York City and Hudson Valley residents. Contribute to this vital work, become a member today.
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A Rainy Afternoon

I have been sitting here looking out the window at the cars driving by with their windshield wipers working as they have been for two days now, the squirrels don’t seem to be bothered by the rain. I am bothered as I watch on the computer from USGS Water Alerts as Oatka Creek, my home water go up. Then I was watching Fly-tying Videos and I thought you might like to see this one from The Orvis Company.

Tying the LaFontaine Sparkle Emerger

Posted: 26 Oct 2011 05:50 AM PDT

Gary LaFontaine’s book Caddisflies, published in 1981, completely revolutionized the ways that anglers understood caddisfly behavior, how trout reacted to it, and how imitations should be tied and fished. LaFontaine, who died of Lou Gehrig’s disease in 2002, had spent a decade studying caddisflies, even donning SCUBA gear to observe the underwater lives of these varied insects. One of his most important findings was that many species of caddisfly pupae rise to the water’s surface via an air sac that surrounds the abdomen. This “bubble” became the signature feature of the patterns LaFontaine invented to mimic these pupae.

In this video, by Tim Flagler of Tightline Productions, Matt Grobert ties his version of a LaFontaine Sparkle Emerger. Grobert, an author and blogger, deviates from LaFontaine’s original, making the tying process somewhat simpler. Designed as an emerger, this pattern can quickly transformed into a Deep Sparkle Pupa by simply cutting off the deer-hair wing. As usual, there are a couple of neat tying tricks on display that you can use for tying all the LaFontaine patterns. For instance, note how Matt ties one bunch of Antron slightly larger than the other, so he can snip some of the fibers later for a trailing shuck. You’ll also learn why it’s important to keep the materials sparse to create a translucent effect in the water.

LaFontaine Sparkle Emerger from Tightline Productions on Vimeo.

          LaFontaine’s Sparkle Emerger
Hook: Standard dry-fly hook (here a Tiemco 100), sizes 12-18.
Thread: Black, 6/0.
          Underbody and shuck: Golden yellow Antron, carded.
Body: Yellow-brown Antron.
Wings: Natural deer hair, cleaned and stacked.
          Thorax: Brown Australian possum dubbing.
Note: Pick out the Antron to create a “bubble” around the body.