Last Day of the Year

Graph of  Gage height, feet

Just sitting here thinking about the year gone by and thought I would show you how up and down my home waters have been lately, as they have been all year.

Here’s also a wish for a very Happy New Year filled with many hours of FLYTYING and catching TROUT.

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Get Your Free I FISH NY Freshwater Fishing Map Today

Available for your next freshwater fishing excursion is our new, colorful map brochure with fishing information on more than 400 lakes, ponds, rivers and streams in New York State. One side of the foldout shows locations of some of the best fishing waters in the state, while the other side provides details on each site, including access points, types of fish, marinas and campsites and other important information. To receive a map in the mail, send an e-mail request with “NY Fishing Map” as the subject to fwfish@gw.dec.state.ny.us. Remember to include your name and complete address in the e-mail.

The state of Rhode Island released its 2012-13 fishing regulations

The state of Rhode Island released its 2012-13 fishing regulations brochure without much fanfare, offering no hint that there was anything controversial or game-changing inside. And it took anglers a little while to read all the way to the bottom of the section titled “Freshwater Fisheries Regulations,” where they were astonished to find something entirely new tacked on:

RI Felt 1 copy

Such a regulation is obviously not new—Vermont and Maryland have enacted similar bans—but it was quite a shock to Rhode Island’s angling population, which didn’t know such a rule was coming. And unlike the bans in the other states, this one includes salt water.

While we think that bans on felt soles are in the best interest of fly fishers everywhere, it seems very strange that Rhode Island chose to implement such a ban without any public input. It will be interesting to see how this story progresses.

Safety tips can help keep ice anglers dry, warm

Early-season ice fishing can be great, but the ice conditions are often sketchy. Here are some tips for staying safe:

Check in with a local sport shop or bait shop to get up-to-date information before you set out.

Check out ice conditions before you go. Ask other anglers or local sources and take into account changes in the weather during the past 24 hours.

If you have even the slightest doubt about the safety of the ice, stay off it.

It’s OK to wear a life jacket or carry a throwable floatation device.

Wear a warm hat that covers your ears. In cold weather, 75 to 80 percent of heat loss from the body occurs from an uncovered head.

Wear mittens. They are warmer than gloves and reduce the chance of frostbite.

Before you leave home, tell someone where you plan to fish and when you plan to return.

Carry a pair of long spikes on a heavy string around your neck. That way if you break through the ice you can use the spikes to grip the ice and pull yourself out of the water.

• Go with someone who knows the water and how ice tends to form and change. For those without an ice-fishing buddy, check out one of the ice-fishing blogs, or a website like www.iceshanty.com, with ice-fishing updates, chat and a map of where ice is found in the U.S. and Canada.

When on the ice, remember:

Read more: http://billingsgazette.com/lifestyles/recreation/safety-tips-can-help-keep-ice-anglers-dry-warm/article_a0e2aff6-0262-5e54-b014-6bbeaf549d91.html#ixzz1hl0CFYyz

PCB cleanup exceeding expectations

 

For years, General Electric argued that dredging its toxic PCB pollution from the Hudson River would only stir up pollution and send it downriver. This month, the Environmental Protection Agency signaled that GE’s old scare tactic was far from the truth when it upped its goal for removing PCB-contaminated sediment by 25%. The cleanup is ahead of schedule, and we’re that much closer to our longstanding goal of restoring the Hudson’s fisheries – and reclaiming our river.

· Get Informed: Read about the history of PCB contamination in the Hudson River.

· Do Your Part! Donate to Riverkeeper’s Hudson River Program.

Felt Bans in the News

The first US felt ban was proposed for Alaska in 2009 and, after several modifications, a statewide ban on the use of felt for recreational fishing will take effect on the 1st of January. This regulation, implemented administratively by the Alaska Board of Fisheries, has been planned for a couple of years so there should be no surprise for anglers or retailers. Meanwhile, most of the press stories about the ban are very supportive. Read More

Alaska joins Vermont and Maryland as states with bans already in place. As we reported last month, Missouri will have a ban on selected cold water fisheries before their season opening. With legislative sessions scheduled to begin across the country in January, it is likely that we will see additional bans debated and perhaps adopted.

With bans spreading it would seem logical that consumers would be looking to purchase non-felt boots. However, the opposite seems to be the case as reports indicate high demand for felt soled boots.

Felt bans are one of the hottest topics among anglers and we continue to provide a comprehensive accounting of all felt ban proposals in the US at

The Shocking Republican Attack on the Environment and Our Drinking Water

Environment News Service / BySharon Guynup

 

 

Ensuring that Americans have clean water has been an effort with strong bipartisan support for four decades. But not anymore.

December 11, 2011 |

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WASHINGTON, DC (ENS) — This year, residents of Midland, Texas sued Dow Chemical for dangerous levels of hexavalent chromium in their drinking water. Chromium-6 is a cancer-causing chemical made infamous by Julia Roberts’ film, “Erin Brockovich.” There are currently no drinking water standards for chromium-6, and the chemical industry is delaying a new U.S. Environmental Protection Agency assessment labeling it a potent carcinogen.

READ MORE http://www.alternet.org/story/153401/the_shocking_republican_attack_on_the_environment_and_our_drinking_water?page=entire